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27 February 2017

The Return of the Sacred in an Age of Terror

A stimulating and challenging address by David Tacey will be the second ‘What in the World is going on?’ forum hosted by the Eremos Institute during 2017.

Details

27 February 2017

The Return of the Sacred in an Age of Terror

Presented by David Tacey

Sunday 9 July 1:30 – 3 pm

Venue: St Francis Xavier Church Hall, 17 Mackenzie St, Lavender Bay.

Book Now: https://www.trybooking.com/PFIS

Cost: $25, or $20 for members; $5 less for early booking by 5 July 2017.

‘What in the World is going on?’ forums hosted by the Eremos Institute during 2017 explore confronting aspects of current world events. 

Please join us for the second in our series, a stimulating and challenging address by David Tacey.

The Return of the Sacred in an Age of Terror

Is it mere coincidence, or is there some synchronicity between the return of the sacred and religious terrorism?

Presented by David Tacey

Sunday 9 July 1:30 – 3 pm

Who would have thought, even a generation ago, that secular thinkers would be speaking of a ‘return of the sacred’ in the West? But sociologists and philosophers are now speaking in these terms, suggesting it is an extraordinary time to be alive. However, traditional religions appear to be among the last to know about these changes. They are still in defensive mode, reacting to the anti-religious temper of the Enlightenment. The West has moved on, and finds itself in a new existential situation.

However, as the West struggles to understand its new relation to the sacred, it does so in the context of religious terrorism. How, and why, are these things related?

Venue: St Francis Xavier Church Hall, 17 Mackenzie St, Lavender Bay.

Book Now: https://www.trybooking.com/PFIS

Cost: $25, or $20 for members; $5 less for early booking by 5 July 2017.

David Tacey is Emeritus Professor of Humanities, La Trobe University, Melbourne, and Research Professor of Public Theology at the Australian Centre for Christianity and Culture, Canberra and works across the fields of spirituality, religion, psychology and Australian culture. David is the author of fourteen books, including Edge of the Sacred, Gods and Diseases, The Darkening Spirit: Jung, Spirituality, Religion. His most recent book is Beyond Literal Belief: Religion as Metaphor.

David is known internationally in the fields of spirituality studies, analytical psychology and psychoanalysis. David is a frequent commentator on radio and has appeared numerous times on television. He is invited to speak on issues of spirituality, religious belief and indigenous cultures. His views are sought on mental health, suicide, depression, anxiety, initiation and rites of passage.

Tacey has appeared on programs broadcast by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and the Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) in Australia, and the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) Radio Four. He has also appeared in programs broadcast by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) in the United States, and the New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation (NZBC).

Read more about David Tacey:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Tacey 

https://www.amazon.com/David-Tacey/e/B001HML6O4 

http://www.catholica.com.au/marketplace/promo/Tacey.php 

http://garrattpublishing.com.au/product/9781925009798/

Comments

David Miller
David Miller - 17 April 2017

If by “sacred” David Tacey means the positive side of human nature (our highest values, our loftiest ideals and our areas of ultimate concern) then, yes, it is a surprise. Unless, of course, it is a defiant reaction to the onslaught of terrorism.
But if ‘sacred’ is a weasel-word meaning ‘supernaturalism’, then there is no surprise. Other-worldly escapism in the face of the horrors of this world is as old as humanity itself.

Linda Turton
Linda Turton - 1 May 2017

I agree with David Miller in his comment that we don’t in this day and age want to be equating ‘sacred’ and ‘supernaturalism’!
My impression from David Tacey’s books and the talks I have heard that his understanding of the ‘sacred’ is grounded in nature, the action of the divine all of a piece with the workings of the earth and the universe and not different or interventionist. He has a very thoughtful and learned approach, informed by his experience of living in Central Australia and other places in Australia. He is deeply committed to grappling with the big questions of the human psyche and our humanity together, and the ecological implications of our collective actions. Religious terrorism and its impact on us, especially our understanding of the sacred - I can’t wait to hear him speak on this.

David Tacey
David Tacey - 21 May 2017

I don’t think “supernatural” is a good word to describe God or the sacred; not any more.  Nor do I think God or the sacred is wholly natural, as that would deny the transcendent dimension. In fact, I don’t think we have a good word anymore for God.  Supernatural is too hackneyed and misunderstood; natural is too simple and reductive. Paul Tillich thought of the term ultra-natural, that is, what is deeply or profoundly natural, and I suppose that is worth considering.  But the sacred cannot be reduced to the “positive side of human nature” as David Miller suggests - that is just to reduce God to wishy washy humanism, and that can’t be right. I do think there is a crisis of language about God and the sacred today, and we need to think more about it.  Thanks for these comments, and hope to see some of you on 9 July.

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