Bless you Heart Attack for Being in my Life

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 Bless you Heart Attack for Being in my Life
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Wrestling with death, health, self and spirit in a new book recently published by Bishop Bruce Wilson, Eremos founder.

(Price includes postage within Australia)

Details about the book

Aged 65, Bruce Wilson suffered a misdiagnosed heart attack. He was offered 50/50 odds that emergency surgery might save his life.  This gripping narrative tells of his journey to a health that literally hangs by a few threads and results uncomfortably in a new life that challenges almost everything he previously was and believed.

Bruce Wilson, 77, is a sociologist, theologian and Anglican bishop, best known for his 1980s best seller Can God Survive in Australia? Work in ministry has taken him from full time University Chaplain (UNSW), Inner City Vicar (Sydney’s Paddington), Theological College Principal (Canberra), Bush bishop (Bathurst to Bourke), Psycho-Spiritual Guide (Blue Mountains). He is married to Zandra, has two adult children and three grandsons.
 

Comments from Reviewers

“The most striking aspect of this unflinchingly personal self-examination is the wide-ranging collection of ideas. Augustine, Freud, Sartre, Girard - to mention only a few - come together in a substantial but vivid invitation to re-examine the realities of life around and within us.” Don Meadows

 

"This is an account of a heart attack - a physical, emotional but also an intellectual and spiritual journey.  Bruce Wilson, telling his story from a patient’s perspective, is inviting us into a bigger story.  A story which can help each of us reflect on ourselves, our world, life and death. It is a story inviting us to reflect on experience by rediscovering some of the riches of our culture's heritage of intellectual and spiritual thought.”  Bishop Genieve Mary Blackwell, Assistant Bishop in the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne.

 

"Grounding his recent spiritual journey in ancient Christian teachings, Bruce Wilson is aware that but for modern medical technology his journey would have been thwarted by an early death. But avoiding death is not his focus, as he contends with heart disease, clinical complexity and determining where God is. Those facing life-threatening situations and those seeking God in the context of ‘everyday life’ are offered new insights from Bishop Wilson’s struggles.” Professor Bernard W. Stewart AM, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney